Russell Sherwood

Is it NORMal?

Russell Sherwood  Monday, March 18, 2019

With the latest Norm being achieved today, it was interesting to note that the WCCF series of Invitational events has now generated 62 Title Norms.

Not bad for one of the youngest members of the ICCF Family!

NormsWCCF

Provisional Rating List

Russell Sherwood  Sunday, March 3, 2019

Provisional List for 2019/2 - Very positive signs with only 4 falling ratings of players rated above 2000.

ICCF Rank Title Name Games 2019/1 Gend 2019/2 +-
210855 1 IM Balshaw, Anthony 493 2471 M 2472 1
810209 2 CCM Yeo, Gareth 268 2444 M 2454 10
810160 3 IM Claridge, John B. 296 2417 M 2417 0
211672 4 IM Lockwood, Austin 217 2395 M 2402 7
810243 5 CCM Evans, Craig 134 2382 M 2394 12
810183 6 CCM Jones, Ian 273 2386 M 2389 3
810161 7 CCM Sherwood, Russell 761 2336 M 2373 37
810139 8 CCM Adams, Mark 167 2361 M 2371 10
810202 9 LGM Sherwood, Helen 645 2337 F 2341 4
810212 10 CCE Sherwood, Alexander 352 2337 M 2339 2
810179 11   Varley, Peter 23 2338 M 2338 0
810163 12 CCM Keevil, Paul 128 2329 M 2335 6
810182 13 CCE Dean, Philip 88 2332 M 2334 2
810208 14 CCE Davies, Adam 94 2307 M 2308 1
810233 15 CCE Scott, Paul 234 2287 M 2299 12
810137 16   Thornton, John D. 25 2293 M 2293 0
810175 17   Williams, John L. 44 2281 M 2281 0
810211 18 CCE Cannon, Dale 88 2274 M 2274 0
810057 19 CCE Sinnett, Glyn 185 2247 M 2258 11
810221 20 CCE Gibbons, Andrew 70 2251 M 2252 1
810184 21   Yüce, Aytaç 115 2233 M 2233 0
810152 22   Clough, Fred 177 2207 M 2219 12
810180 23   Nettles, Paul Eric 56 2216 M 2218 2
810174 24   Bishop, William 6 0 M 2208  
810247 25   Hatchett, Paul 45 2298 M 2184 -114
810222 26   Smith, Andrew 118 2175 M 2167 -8
810259 27   Denton, Sean 45 2145 M 2166 21
810195 28   Bevan, Peter M. 97 2148 M 2142 -6
810165 29   Bailey, S. 118 2104 M 2115 11
810061 30   Griffiths, Martyn J. 108 2092 M 2092 0
810075 31   Wakeham, Marc R. 467 2051 M 2064 13
219118 32   Robertshaw, Andrew M. 239 2036 M 2036 0
810248 33   Hurn, Robert 20 2005 M 2003 -2

Some light reading

Russell Sherwood  Sunday, March 3, 2019

I often get asked about how Engines "Think"

The linked article below gives an interesting, beginner level introduction, which should save me some time!

Unfortunately, it is in Russian but Chrome's translate function does an excellent job!

https://habr.com/ru/post/390821/

 

 

Old School

Russell Sherwood  Thursday, February 28, 2019

It's been interesting, starting to play in the Bill Flew memorial for three reasons

First of all, the use of the Silli pairing system has led to a very different pool of opposition to that normally encountered, which I believe has gone down well with players.

Secondly, ta rather more loose style is being played, due somewhat to the games being unrated, necessary for us to make the event Engine free

Finally and in many ways, the most interesting has been to see the different approaches - some are playing this like OTB, whereas others appear to be utilising old-school CC methods. For my own preparation, I looked over some of my older Tim Harding texts, which whilst obsolete for modern CC, are a treasure trove for this kind of event!

In addition to this, from wider discussions, it does appear that there is some appetite for events that are a little.......different, be it the pairing system or time control. If you have anything you would like to see tried out get in touch!

Counties & Districts 2018

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Conditional Weapon

Russell Sherwood  Saturday, January 12, 2019

The advent of the TriBi time control system has removed some old tactics utilised by some players (Dead Man’s Defence for example) but has provided some new avenues. One of these is the use of the conditional move as a tactical weapon.

 

In a traditional event, if a player got into time trouble, all they had to do was get through to the next time control (typically less than 10 moves) and then normality could be resumed. However with TriBi, once in time trouble, there is no way to get out of it. Some players have seen an opportunity to now try and push their opponent into a special kind of time trouble: The Deficit. What is this? In simple terms One player has significantly more time on the clock than another, hoping this can lead to a time crunch for the other player.

 

For example, if one player has 120 days on the clock against 100 days of their opponent this is not an issue but if this winds down and becomes 15 days against 3 then problems can exist for the 2nd player. There are some protections within the ICCF rules with regard to active play however the best approach is not to get into this situation.

 

A tactic which I have seen being utilised is the used of conditional moves. If we assume it takes T1 time to make a move (an incorrect assumption but bear with me) and it takes T2 time to make a conditional move.  We can assume that T2 will be a lot shorter than T1, in some cases it is only the length of time to enter the move onto the server. If a player makes conditional moves and their opponent “accepts” a significant proportion of them, then it is fairly simple to see that the first player will build up a comfortable time buffer fairly quickly, unless the 2nd player’s move selection time is significantly shorter than the firsts!

 

So in practice, this means conditional moves should be considered when the opponent's response is “obvious” or your response to their most likely move is “obvious”, to build up a time buffer, so you are never on the receiving end of this tactic.

 

It is worth adding that a number of players have been observed letting their clocks run quite a while in opening positions, probably not realised the event is TriBI, make sure this, not you!

 

Till the next time! 

Drinking you under the Tablebases

Russell Sherwood  Sunday, January 6, 2019

I have written a little on tablebases in the past. Seven Piece tablebases are available but the size of these presents something on an issue.

What would be useful is to know the frequency of their use......

A while ago I came across the table below. The most interesting part of this is that the top two sets cover 35% of situations that arise. So if you want to get an edge perhaps downloading these is an answer?

 

 

 

occurrences:

      616,969

 

size:

   1,209.06

    96

83.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      1

KRPPKRP

   153,091

   23,261,437,520

     9,444,643,920

      30.46

      2

24.8%

      2

KPPPKPP

     63,395

     2,107,379,792

          89,290,832

        2.05

      2

10.3%

      3

KBPPKBP

     24,923

   30,746,474,768

     5,561,195,536

      33.81

      2

4.0%

      4

KNPPKNP

     20,204

   29,087,503,696

     6,536,127,184

      33.18

      2

3.3%

      5

KRPPPKR

     20,144

     1,075,778,832

     1,372,519,888

        2.28

      2

3.3%

      6

KNPPKBP

     19,617

   30,955,844,688

     7,104,144,272

      35.45

      2

3.2%

      7

KBPPKNP

     17,783

   28,727,898,832

     6,471,055,824

      32.78

      2

2.9%

      8

KBPPKPP

     15,470

     7,973,639,248

     1,058,776,592

        8.41

      2

2.5%

      9

KNPPKPP

     13,554

     9,689,699,280

     1,550,631,440

      10.47

      2

2.2%

     10

KRPPKPP

     13,052

     5,054,627,664

     1,127,383,952

        5.76

      2

2.1%

     11

KQPPKQP

     12,302

   22,632,171,664

   12,926,209,872

      33.12

      2

2.0%

     12

KBPPKRP

     12,082

   31,606,770,192

   12,859,232,976

      41.41

      2

2.0%

     13

KRBPKRP

     11,080

   48,381,043,216

   44,069,083,408

      86.10

      2

1.8%

     14

KPPPKBP

      9,392

     7,584,064,976

     1,438,176,656

        8.40

      2

1.5%

     15

KRNPKRP

      9,210

   58,025,199,248

   49,364,431,312

     100.01

      2

1.5%

     16

KRPPKBP

      9,074

   11,435,368,336

     4,241,347,984

      14.60

      2

1.5%

     17

KPPPKRP

      8,564

     4,645,229,072

     1,834,192,656

        6.03

      2

1.4%

     18

KQPPKPP

      8,339

     2,109,622,288

        433,126,416

        2.37

      2

1.4%

     19

KPPPKNP

      8,151

     6,680,648,720

        900,566,160

        7.06

      2

1.3%

     20

KNPPKRP

      7,567

   29,911,219,856

   12,131,137,360

      39.15

      2

1.2%

     21

KRPPKNP

      6,025

     9,632,432,848

     3,575,949,264

      12.30

      2

1.0%

     22

KPPPKQP

      5,228

     2,269,738,128

        749,323,664

        2.81

      2

0.8%

     23

KPPPPKP

      5,075

        336,964,944

           9,884,688

        0.32

      2

0.8%

     24

KRPPKRB

      4,330

   28,687,360,336

     5,877,489,808

      32.19

      2

0.7%

     25

KRPPKQP

      3,904

   16,689,932,048

     8,281,893,072

      23.26

      2

0.6%

     26

KRPPKRN

      3,785

   27,834,688,208

     6,556,337,296

      32.03

      2

0.6%

     27

KBPPPKP

      3,575

     1,491,992,336

        139,152,784

        1.52

      2

0.6%

     28

KBPPPKB

      2,807

     1,797,519,120

        503,454,608

        2.14

      2

0.5%

     29

KNPPPKP

      2,788

     1,731,776,336

        189,133,392

        1.79

      2

0.5%

     30

KQPPPKP

      2,662

        189,038,864

          66,055,056

        0.24

      2

0.4%

     31

KBNPKRP

      2,458

   82,917,193,040

   32,889,776,976

     107.85

      2

0.4%

     32

KQPPKRP

      2,324

     5,506,660,816

     3,009,336,272

        7.93

      2

0.4%

     33

KBPPPKR

      2,044

     6,897,087,952

     2,689,630,224

        8.93

      2

0.3%

     34

KQPPPKQ

      1,922

     3,745,607,056

     4,634,537,424

        7.80

      2

0.3%

     35

KBPPPKN

      1,760

        664,016,016

        264,358,928

        0.86

      2

0.3%

     36

KNPPPKR

      1,368

     7,312,293,712

     2,733,418,128

        9.36

      2

0.2%

     37

KBBPKBP

      1,075

   33,115,579,408

   12,847,387,216

      42.81

      2

0.2%

     38

KPPPPKR

      1,031

     1,762,525,008

        648,855,760

        2.25

      2

0.2%

     39

KRPPKBN

        955

   28,996,307,344

   12,680,283,216

      38.81

      2

0.2%

     40

KRPPPKQ

        667

   11,111,429,008

     5,198,413,840

      15.19

      2

0.1%

     41

KPPPPKN

        576

        439,768,208

          65,003,088

        0.47

      2

0.1%

     42

KPPPPKB

        574

        632,390,160

          75,195,600

        0.66

      2

0.1%

     43

KPPPPKQ

        448

     1,199,301,520

        598,771,280

        1.67

      2

0.1%

     44

KNNPKNP

        384

   47,429,430,096

   23,357,510,800

      65.93

      2

0.1%

     45

KRBNKRB

          54

   46,163,484,752

   54,810,115,280

      94.04

      2

0.0%

     46

KRBNKRN

          43

   41,632,251,088

   72,137,970,192

     105.96

      2

0.0%

     47

KRBBKRB

          18

   12,598,941,008

   16,965,106,960

      27.53

      2

0.0%

     48

KRBBKRN

           8

   14,069,139,408

   17,604,229,456

      29.50

      2

0.0%

Something for nothing 2?

Russell Sherwood  Sunday, January 6, 2019

Another New in Chess initiative

Dear Chess Friend,

Vote for the Yearbook Novelty of the Year 2018 and WIN!

We would like to know what you think was the best opening novelty of 2018. The inventor of the novelty will receive a prize of € 350. Among those who have voted for the winning novelty, a FREE 1-year subscription to the Yearbook will be raffled.

You can cast your vote only until February 1.

Sincerely,
Remmelt Otten
New In Chess 

Something for nothing?

Russell Sherwood  Sunday, January 6, 2019

Players may be interested in the opportunity to take part in the following survey, distributed by New in Chess

 

Dear Player,

We are social scientists conducting an academic research study on tournament chess players’ practice habits, chess ratings, and opinions about a variety of chess-related questions. If you are interested in helping us with our research, please click the link below to access our survey. The survey will take 10–20 minutes. We think you may find the survey questions interesting, thought-provoking, and fun to answer. This survey is primarily targeted toward chess players who have a FIDE or USCF rating, but all chess players are welcome to complete it.
 
If you complete the survey, you are eligible to win a prize. For every 100 people who complete the survey, we will randomly choose one person to receive $30 voucher to the New In Chess online store. We will also randomly select three participants out of everyone who completes the survey to receive a one-year digital subscription to New In Chess magazine. You are eligible for these prizes if you complete the survey and provide an email address at the end of the survey.
 
When we finish collecting and analyzing your data, we will make a complete, anonymized report of the results available to everyone who participated in the study and provided their email address at the end of the survey.

 

If you are under 18 years old, you may still participate in our study! However, you must get a parent or guardian’s permission before you do. If you are a parent of a chess player member who is under 18, we request that you allow them to complete the survey (but we encourage you to be present while they do and to help them if necessary).
 
Sincerely,

Patrick Heck, Ph.D. & Christopher Chabris, Ph.D.
 
PS If you have any questions or comments about this survey, please email Patrick Heck: [email protected].

Access Survey

 

Goals, Goals and Goals

Russell Sherwood  Monday, December 31, 2018

At the start of 2018 I set a number of Goals for the publishing on the website. The first of these was to better the record for each month. The second was to reach 200 posts. The third and most stretching was to post more in 2018 than in the previous 6 years of the website.

I’m quite happy that all of these goals were achieved. So what next for 2019? That will remain to be seen but will be in line with our more International outlook as a Federation.

As always if you have any area you would like to read about in CC, let me know. We might cover it, we might not but it costs nothing to ask!

Welsh Correspondence Chess FederationBritish Correspondence Chess AssociationSchemingMind Internet Correspondence Chess ClubSocial Correspondence Chess AssociationWelsh Chess UnionInternational Correspondence Chess Association